Special Topics in Marketing


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE ΝΚ74Β SEMESTER 7th
COURSE TITLE Special Topics in Marketing

 

INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
4 6
COURSE TYPE Core
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: HELLENIC
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS YES (ESSAY IN ENGLISH)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
 
 

Special Topics in Marketing course focuses on the role of marketing as creating value for customers. Emphasis is placed on creating and capturing value, identifying customer needs and understanding purchasing processes, forming target segments, positioning the product, and managing brand equity. A Also, selected topics emphasizing the integration of marketing literature with current business practices  through seminar discussions and individual field investigations

 

 

Correlation of the course with the Department’s subject

The Department of Economics aims to study and promote economic science. It offers all those theoretical and quantitative tools that allow the understanding of the economic environment. E-commerce is nowadays an integral part of this environment.  By this course the students / female students will gain a solid understanding of the theoretical and conceptual principles of marketing and  understand how to develop and manage a strategic marketing initiative.

 

.

General Competences
 

Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

 

  • SYLLABUS
Marketing, definition

Marketing, process definition

Customer needs, wants and demands

Market offerings – goods, services, experiences

Customer value and satisfaction

Exchanges and relationships

Markets

Marketing management orientations

Customer relationship management, definition

Creating customer loyalty and retention

Growing market and revenue share

Building customer equity

Marketing mix, a brief introduction, 4Ps, 7Ps

Marketing research process

Positioning strategy

Market Targeting

Segmentation

The promotion / communication mix

 

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY Face-to-face presentations from the professors and the students – Exams
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

 

Utilization of eclass.duth.gr
TEACHING METHODS

 

Activity Semester workload
Professors’ lectures 52 hours
Students’ lectures 30 hours
Student’s preparation 80 hours
Course total 162 hours
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

 

WRITTEN EXAMS AT THE END OF THE SEMESTER
  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
1 Ηλεκτρονικό Εμπόριο και Marketing Σ. Δημητριάδης και Γ. Μπάλτας (ΔΜ)

1η Έκδοση

Εκδόσεις Rossili 2003

 

Public Finance


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE ΝΕ77 SEMESTER 7th
COURSE TITLE Public Finance
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
Lectures 4 6
 
 
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

Elective (Special Background)
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: Greek
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

This course introduces the student to the basic issues and problems of Public Finance regarding the role of government in a market economy. Specifically introductory concepts are studied and analyzed, also the tools that will allow the understanding of the role and importance regarding the structure of public expenditure and the tax burden for effectiveness and fair distribution, and the interventionist-regulatory role of the government when market economy fails.

 

Specifically, after the successful completion of the learning process the expected learning outcomes aimed to be:

● capability for students to provide with clarity standard terms and explain the basic principles and concepts of Public Finance and the ability to structure economic arguments in a coherent and convincing manner.

● illustrative ability of how economic agents forms decisions and make choices in the framework of Public Finance.

● develop the capacity to use economic reasoning to formulate and evaluate public policy propositions on the regulatory role of the government.

● deepening the understanding of economic theory concepts using mathematical and quantitative methods, modeling economic systems using these methods, effective data analysis and synthesis with a view to developing various ways of thinking (inductive, productive) and the development of Public Economic problem solving strategies

● developing skills of effective application of economic logic and methods in the study of Public Finance

● effective communication and explanation of economic arguments both to people with knowledge of Public Finance and non-specialists.

 

 

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

1. Search, analysis and synthesis of data and information with the use of the necessary theoretical tools

2. autonomous work

3. Teamwork

4. Critical rezoning and self-criticism

 

 

 

  • SYLLABUS
1. The general role of the government

2. The size and scope of government’s activities

3. Positive Analysis Tools

4. Normative Analysis Tools

5. Public goods

6. Externalities

7. redistribution policies

8. Taxation and income distribution

9. Taxation and effectiveness

10. Efficient and fair taxation

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
Class lectures
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
Notes, slides, etc posted on e-class

Support of the learning process via e-class

TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 52 hours
independent study

(it is estimated that the assimilation takes about 2 hours of study for each lecture one hour)

98 hours
Course total 150 hours
Activity with assignment Semester workload
Lectures 52 hours
independent study

(it is estimated that the assimilation takes about 2 hours of study for each lecture one hour)

98 hours
assignment preparation 16 hours
Writing and assignment presentation 4 hours
Course total 170 hours
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

1. After concluding the lectures will follow written examinations where it will gathered the 100% of total evaluation score.

2. Bonuses will be given up to 2 units in addition to the score of the exam in the form of voluntary assignment, conditional that the written exam will gather more than 5 out of 10 points.

 

3. Exams are conducted in Greek and comprise a combination of questions – questions of short answers using charting and mathematical analysis, open-ended questions, judgment questions, theorem proving, solving problems and exercises.

 

4. The evaluation criteria are communicated to students in the first lecture, which are explicitly stated in the syllabus of the course, which is shared as a handout, also available in e-class

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
– Suggested bibliography:

– Related academic journals:

1) Δημόσια Οικονομική: Σύγχρονη Θεωρία και Ελληνική Πραγματικότητα των Harvey

Rosen,Ted Gayer, Βασίλη Θ. Ράπανου και Γεωργίας Καπλάνογλου, εκδόσεις Κριτική (2011)

2) Εισαγωγή στη Δημόσια Οικονομική, Θ. Γεωργακόπουλος, εκδόσεις Ε.Μπένου 2012

Άλλα εγχειρίδια

1) Public Finance and Public Policy, Gruber, J., Worth Publishers, 2004.

2) Οικονομική του Δημόσιου Τομέα, Stiglitz, J. E., εκδόσεις Κριτική, 1992

3) Εισαγωγή στη Δημόσια Οικονομική, Β. Δαλαμάγκας, εκδόσεις Κριτική, 2010

4) Οικονομική πολιτική, Βαβούρας Ιωάννης Σ. 2013 Εκδόσεις Παπαζήση

5) Αρχές οικονομικής πολιτικής, Κυπριανός Π. Προδρομίδης 2013 Εκδόσεις Ι. Σιδέρη

6) Μικροοικονομική, Varian Hal R. εκδόσεις Κριτική, 2006

7) Μικροοικονομική, Besanko David A., Braeutigam Ronald R., εκδόσεις ΔΑΡΔΑΝΟΣ Ο.Ε., 2009

 

 

 

 

Monetary Policy


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC SCIENCES
ACADEMIC UNIT ECONOMICS
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE ΝΚ71 SEMESTER 7th
COURSE TITLE MONETARY POLICY
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
4 6
 
 
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

General Background
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: Greek
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes (in English)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

 

 

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

·         Understand the sources of money and money substitutes

·         Demonstrate a systematic understanding of monetary policy theory;

·         Critically evaluate the dilemmas and constraints facing monetary policy makers;

·         Describe and explain the main channels of the monetary transmission mechanism, through which monetary policy can have real effects on the economy;

·         Have a comprehensive understanding of the role of financial intermediaries in macroeconomics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

 

 

Decision-making

Working independently

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

 

 

 

 

  • SYLLABUS
 

 

The course discusses the conduct of monetary policy, its goals and targets, and the tools available to the monetary policymaker. The course looks specifically into the monetary policy process and the operation of the European Central Bank and the Federal Reserve, and the regulation and supervision of the financial system. Next, we examine the different channels in the transmission mechanism of monetary policy. We also explore the use of unconventional monetary policies following the financial crisis. Finally, the course, by looking at issues in the design of optimal monetary policy institutions, investigates the time-inconsistency problem of monetary policy as well as the desirability of an independent and transparent central banker.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
Face-to-face
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
Support the learning process through the online platform e-class
TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 52
Individual Study 98
Course total 150
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

 

 

A Writing Exam (100%) including:

– Multiple-choice questionnaires

– Short-answer questions

-problem solving

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
– Suggested bibliography:

·         Mishkin, F. S. (2016). The Economics of Money, Banking, and Financial Markets. 11th Edition. Pearson Education.

·         Cecchetti, S. G., Schoenholtz, K. L. (2015). Money, banking, and financial markets. 4th Edition. McGraw-Hill Education.

·         Howells, P. G., & Bain, K. (2007). Financial markets and institutions. 5th Edition. Pearson Education.

·         Walsh, C. (2010). Monetary Theory and Policy. 3rd Edition. MIT Press.

 

 

 

 

Mergers and Acquisitions


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE NE76 SEMESTER 7th
COURSE TITLE Mergers and Acquisitions
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
Lectures 4 6
 
 
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

Elective (Special Background)
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: Greek
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) Course description available at e-class https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/KOM06186/

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

 

After the course, students should be able to understand and explain the business process of mergers and acquisitions, what drives the strategy of mergers and acquisitions, how the target company is selected, what determines the company valuation and the different methods with which it can be achieved, how to negotiate, what is the role of each interested party and the factors leading to a successful acquisition or merger. In addition, they will be able to understand the motives of buyers and sellers, the role of investment banks, advisers and fund providers.

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

 

·         Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

·         Working independently

·         Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

 

  • SYLLABUS
 

Mergers and acquisitions are a key element of corporate strategy and business activity almost on a daily basis. In booming periods, companies use mergers and acquisitions to accelerate their growth (in the same market) or to expand either in new markets or in other geographical areas. In recession times, mergers and acquisitions may be necessary, as company administrations have to make important decisions: Can the company survive as an independent entity? Does the company need additional funds? Is it time to sell? These decisions may have to be taken in the light of stricter regulatory frameworks, particularly in the financial sector, and may require resources that are limited (especially in crisis periods). Irrespective of whether we are experiencing rising or falling markets, mergers and acquisitions remain in the focus of interest for business administrations. And not only, as it is an activity with many stakeholders: human resources, shareholders, customers, vendors, regulators, the wider sector etc., and affects each and every division of the company, such as financial services, IT, the commercial department, etc.

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
·         Class lectures

·         Notes, slides, etc posted on e-class

USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
·         Support of the learning process via e-class

·         Use of internet

TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 52
Study 104
Course total 156 (26 hours per Credit Unit)
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

 

In class exam

·         Solution of exercises relevant to the quantitative part of the topics covered

·         Comparative assessment of the theoretical topics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
 

·         Αποτίμηση επιχειρήσεων. Θεωρία-Μεθοδολογία-Πρακτική, Λαζαρίδης Θεμιστοκλής

·         Εταιρική Διακυβέρνηση, Θ. Λαζαρίδης, Ε. Δρυμπέτας

 

 

International Relations and Economic Diplomacy


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE SEMESTER 7th
COURSE TITLE International Relations and Economic Diplomacy
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
Lectures and Essays
 
 
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

General Knoweldge
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: Greek
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/KOM06211/

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

This course is based on contemporary methods of theory and bibliography, since it combines the theoretical approaches of International Relations with the specials tools provided by the economic diplomacy. More specifically, the given course focuses on the exercise and implementation of economic diplomacy via state and non-state actors by examining and comparing several case studies. In this context, students will be capable of understanding the theoretical background as well as the basic tools of economic diplomacy and their impact on world politics.

•              they will have developed a satisfied level of understanding the interaction between the actors.

•              they will be capable of understanding and interpret the causes and the means of exercising foreign policy, through

economic diplomacy,

•              they will have a more critical and global approach about the issues of international politics, due to the

interdisciplinary methods.

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

 

·          Research, analysis and synthesis of data and information with the use of technology

·          Team work or individual

·          Research in an disciplinary environment

 

  • SYLLABUS
Unit 1: Introduction to I.R Theories

Lecture 1: Introduction

Lecture 2: Realism-Liberalism

 

Unit 2: Foreign Policy and Economic Diplomacy: means and actors

Lecture 3: Introduction: Context, Actors and Objectives of Foreign Policy: the role of Economic Diplomacy

Lecture 4: International Trade

Lecture 5: Foreign Direct Investments

Lecture 6: International Developing Cooperation

Lecture 7: National Security

 

 

Unit 3: Cases Studies

Lecture 8: The US Economic Diplomacy

Lecture 9: The Economic Diplomacy of former colonial powers (UK, France)

Lecture 10– 11: The Economic Diplomacy of the emerging economies (BRICS)

Lecture 12: Economic Diplomacy and International Organizations (UNDP, WORLD BANK)

Unit 4: Conclusions

Lecture13: Conclusions

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
Class Lectures
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
Support of the learning process via e-class and use of internet
TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 50
Study 30
Essays 45
Course total 125
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

The evaluation is held in Greek and consists of two parts. The first part has to do with open-ended questions and the second part has to do with team or individual essay (up 3.000 words appr.) The essay will not be taken into account unless the student(s) has/ve a passing grade.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
 

World Bank, 2016 στο http://www.worldbank.org/projects

 

History of Economic Theories


The sum of the teaching material can be found on the following page on E-class: https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/KOM06161/.

Course description

This course aims to give the student of Economics a complete and diachronic depiction of economic theories. By presenting different perspectives and schools of thought, the acquaintance and enhancement of the young economist’s critical thinking are sought.

Learning outcomes

This course’s attendance will give students the necessary abilities to:

  • Understand the development of economic theory from a historical perspective.
  • Understand the emergence of new “Paradigms” and heterodox currents in economics.
  • Distinguish similarities and differences between schools of economic thought.
  • To realize the co-evolution between economic reality and the ways it is conceived and implemented in socio-economic policy.
  • To link the development of contemporary economic science with the evolving world economy and with today’s phase of crisis and globalization’s restructuring.

General skills

  • Comprehensively understand the central economic concepts.
  • To approach the different ways of looking at economic reality from an evolutionary perspective.
  • Critical thinking.
  • To promote free, creative, and inductive thinking.

Course contents

  1. Economics and history of economic theories
  2. Economic history and the development of economic thought
  3. Dynamics of first capitalist development
  4. The classical political economy
  5. The critique of classical capitalist development and the foundation of Marxist thought
  6. Traditional neoclassical approaches
  7. The critique of neoclassical “optimism”: The German historical school’s objection, the first American institutionalism, and the Keynesian revolution
  8. Post-Keynesian approaches to economic growth and neoclassical synthesis: Theoretical deadlocks and necessary transcendences
  9. The “underestimated” Schumpeterian heterodoxy
  10. The Maoist model, the school of dependence, and neo-Marxist approaches: Conceptual convergences and divergences
  11. The gradual transition to globalization
  12. Latest streams of thought in economics
  13. Revisiting the course’s content and recapitulation

Bibliography

Required textbooks (In Greek)

  • Ιστορία της οικονομικής αναλύσεως
    Κωδικός Βιβλίου στον Εύδοξο: 41964131
    Έκδοση: 2η έκδ./2015
    Συγγραφείς: Θεοχάρης Ρηγίνος Δ.
    ISBN: 978-960-02-3038-3
    Τύπος: Σύγγραμμα
    Διαθέτης (Εκδότης): ΕΚΔΟΣΕΙΣ ΠΑΠΑΖΗΣΗ ΑΕΒΕ
  • Το οικονομικό σύστημα και η εξέλιξή του
    Κωδικός Βιβλίου στον Εύδοξο: 11812
    Έκδοση: 1η έκδ./2009
    Συγγραφείς: Χατζηκωνσταντίνου Γεώργιος Θ.
    ISBN: 978-960-218-652-7
    Τύπος: Σύγγραμμα
    Διαθέτης (Εκδότης): ΕΚΔΟΣΕΙΣ ΚΡΙΤΙΚΗ ΑΕ

Recommended textbooks and scientific articles

European Economy


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE NK72 SEMESTER 8th
COURSE TITLE European Economy
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
4 6
 
 
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

General Background
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: HELLENIC
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS YES (ESSAY IN ENGLISH)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

 

The European Economy guides students through the facts, theories and controversies surrounding the dynamics of European economics. With clear and comprehensive discussions about European history, law, institutions, politics and policies, students are encouraged to explore and analyse the contemporary status of the enlargement in the European Union. By the end of the module students will have achieved a quantitative and qualitative understanding of EU current policy issues. Students will have developed the skills to analyse critically current and possible EU policy developments. Students will have acquired knowledge of current events including trends and developments in EU economic data, policy institutions and legislation, and theoretical and econometric models of policy.

 

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Working independently

Team work

Criticism

  • SYLLABUS
The course aims to develop students’ ability to analyse what is happening in the macro economy in European countries. It  focuses on aspects of macroeconomic policy, with emphasis on its conduct in the EU, investigating current policy issues, and considers the development of current policy thinking in the light of recent experience. The syllabus will typically cover the following topics: the functioning of the EU and European Monetary Union.

The EU can no longer be viewed as simply a trading organisation. It has developed into much more than that and continues to develop in terms of increasing the level of economic integration between its members and the number of members. In recent years we have witnessed the establishment of the single European market, the introduction of the single currency, the Euro and the expansion of the EU from 12 countries to its current complement of 28. This introductory module will provide students with an insight into the nature of the EU as an organisation, not only in theoretical approach but also in macroeconomics. However, it will investigate and explore the economic and political rationale for the establishment of the EU and the nature and the role of the main EU institutions. Economic integration will be discussed further in relation to the development of the single European market and the introduction of the Euro. Since 2008, the year when the global financial crisis burst on the scene, incidents for divergence among Eurozone countries have increased. Despite the initiatives that were launched during the last years, the convergence of many financial indices is not evident among the countries members. Furthermore, the relationship between Britain and the rest of the EU will be explored in some depth.

 

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
Face-to-face
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
E-mail and e-class
TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 52
Assignments 20
Independent study 78
Course total 150
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

Written examination (100%):

– short-answer questions

– problem solving

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
– Suggested bibliography:

De Grauwe, P. (2016). Economics of monetary union. Oxford university press.

 

– Related academic journals:

 

 

 

 

Entrepreneurship I


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL POLITICAL, SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC SCIENCES
ACADEMIC UNIT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
LEVEL OF STUDIES UNDERGRADUATE
COURSE CODE NK73 SEMESTER 7
COURSE TITLE ENTREPRENEURSHIP I
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
LECTURES 4 6
WORKSHOPS
LECTURES FROM ENTREPRENEURS
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

SPECIALIZATION
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: GREEK
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS YES
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) http://www.econ.duth.gr/undergraduate/lessons/z8.shtml

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

 

Entrepreneurship is the driving force for an economy. Wealth and the majority of employment are the result of small business creation from business-minded individuals, many of whom continue creating even larger firms.

 

The goal of this course is to familiarize students in their last year of study with the concept of entrepreneurship and the effective and productive utilization of the knowledge they gained during their studies by creating a new business.

To do this, we are based on:

·         the knowledge and skills acquired by the students so far in their studies

·         and also in teaching relevant new concepts and skills

 

Thus, our students will be able to develop the skills that are necessary to establish, expand and run a successful business, and to work effectively as business managers.

 

Particular emphasis is given to foster and enhance the entrepreneurial culture that will precede the mood to create a new company (startup intention). This perspective is based on the premise that becoming an entrepreneur can be the result of education and training. Thus, entrepreneurs are “made” and are not “born”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

 

• Teamwork

• Decision making

• Brainstorming

• Innovation

• Enterprise Creation Simulation

• Ability to analyse complex ideas

• Training to resolve complex issues

• Market Research

• Creation of advertising spots

• Presenting ideas through Posters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • SYLLABUS
Topics:

•        The meaning and importance of entrepreneurship and the environment in which it grows.

•        The definition of entrepreneurship and the entrepreneur.

•        The stages of the business process:

o   Capturing a business idea

o   Evaluating the business model,

o   Creating a business plan,

o   Fundraising  and forming agreements

o   Selection of sustainable development model and

o   Exploring exit strategies.

•        Start-up issues for new entrepreneurs

•        Promotion and advertising aspects of products or services

•        An understanding of modern finance

•        Evaluation of investment plans, financial analysis of investment.

•        Break-Even-Point Analysis

•        SWOT Analysis.

•        SPACE-Matrix Analysis.

• Preparation of an integrated Business Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
Lectures, workshops, working groups
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
•         Eclass

•         Social media

•         Emails

TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 30
Workshops 20
Creating advertisement spot 20
Producing a Business Plan 70
Creating a Poster 10
 
 
 
Course total 150
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

 

•        Presentation of the business idea

•        Creation and presentation of an advertising spot

•        Creation and presentation of a Poster for the Poster Session

•        Produce a complete Business Plan and Presenting it

•        At the end of the semester following the evaluation of the Business Plans three prizes are awarded in cooperation with the Macedonian Thrace Brewery (Vergina) during a relevant event. The prizes are awarded by the Chief Executive Officer Dimitris Politopoulos are:

·         1st prize € 900

·         2nd prize € 600

·         3rd prize € 300

•        The 10 best innovative ideas and business plans are also awarded commemorative distinctions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
P. Gogas, I. Pragidis, Entrepreneurship Guide – From Theory to Practice, Publisher Sofia, 2014.

 

 

 

Economics of SE Europe


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE NK74A SEMESTER 7th
COURSE TITLE Economics of Southeast Europe
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
4 6
COURSE TYPE Core
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: HELLENIC
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS YES (ESSAY IN ENGLISH)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) http://www.econ.duth.gr/undergraduate/lessons/h8.shtml

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
 
 

The course Economics of Southeast Europe aims at deepening and broadening knowledge in economic terms for the countries of Southeastern Europe. In particular, the course aims to impart to students the importance of the Balkan region in the economic environment of Europe and the economic relations between Greece with the respective countries.

Aspects discussed include ownership structures, centralised planning principles, physical distribution of resources, income distribution patterns and consumer satisfaction problems

Also, the course aims at providing students with a theoretical and historical understanding of the command economy structures and policies that dominated Southeastern European economies after the Second World War, and at exploring, in more detail, their transition and evolution into market economies from 1989 to the present

 

 

Correlation of the course with the Department’s subject

 

This course  focus on how students will acquire a thorough knowledge of: – the economic forces that affect the process of European integration for the countries of Southeastern Europe, and the growth momentum compared with the existing situation in the midst of the economic crisis on the respective countries…

 

.

General Competences
Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

  • SYLLABUS
Week 1: Introduction, Southeast Europe – The “uncovered” space.

 

Week 2: The transition course and systemic transformation of the Balkan countries.

 

Week 3: The end of real existing socialism – the state of relations between the countries of the region with the EU.

 

Week 4: Regional Cooperation in Southeast Europe.

 

Week 5. The development course and the current economic situation in the respective countries.

 

Week 6. The economic relations between Greece and the Balkan countries.

 

Week 7: The Greek economic crisis and its impact on Southeast Europe.

 

Week 8.9: Foreign Direct Investment – Theoretical Approaches.

 

Week 10,11,12: Positive and Negative Effects of FDI – Location selection criteria for multinationals – The Greek FDIs in the countries of Southeast Europe.

 

Week 13: Course Review

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY Face-to-face lectures
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

 

Utilization of eclass.duth.gr
TEACHING METHODS

 

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 52 hours
Study 98 hours
Course total 150 hours
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

 

 

WRITTEN EXAMS AT THE END OF THE SEMESTER

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
(1)   Βιβλίο [11239]: Εγχειρίδιο ξένων επενδύσεων στις βαλκανικές χώρες, Χαζάκης Κωνσταντίνος Λεπτομέρειες

(2)   Βιβλίο [30091]: Η πολιτική οικονομία της μετάβασης, Χαζάκης Κωνσταντίνος,Πελαγίδης Θεόδωρος Κ. Λεπτομέρειες

(3)  Βιβλίο [24691]: Τα νέα Βαλκάνια, Γεώργιος Α. Κουρβετάρης, Βίκτωρ Ν. Ρουδομέτωφ, Κλεομένης Σ. Κουτσούκης, Ανδρέας Γ. Κουρβετάρης Λεπτομέρειες