Special Topics in Macro


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE NK82 SEMESTER 8th
COURSE TITLE Special Topics in Macro
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
4 6
 
 
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

General Background
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: HELLENIC
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS YES (ESSAY IN ENGLISH)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

The course is based on mathematical documentation of the dominant theories which helps students to acquire critical thinking and analytical spirit in conducting economic policy.

 

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Working independently

Team work

Criticism

  • SYLLABUS
The course Special Topics in Macroeconomics introduces students to the concepts of economic growth. Analyzed issues concerning the determinants of long run performance of an economy as well as the dominant analytical theories for the changes in economic mechanisms while students get familiar with some key empirical regularities in the growth process. Lectures deal with the neoclassical growth model, from Solow-Swan in the 1950s and recent refinements, Ramsey model, technological change and R&D, including expansions in the variety and quality of products and the diffusion of knowledge. These concepts are analyzed in the framework of exogenous and endogenous models. The course is based on mathematical documentation of the dominant theories which helps students to acquire critical thinking and analytical spirit in conducting economic policy.

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
Face-to-face
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
E-mail and e-class
TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 52
Independent study 98
Course total 150
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

Written examination (100%):

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
– Suggested bibliography: (in Greek)

Kalaitzidakis and Kalyvitis (2008). Economic Growth: Theory and Policy.

 

– Related academic journals:

 

 

 

 

Regional Economics


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE NE87 SEMESTER 8th
COURSE TITLE REGIONAL ECONOMICS
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
4 6
COURSE TYPE ELECTIVE
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: HELLENIC
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS YES (ESSAY IN ENGLISH)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) http://www.econ.duth.gr/undergraduate/lessons/h8.shtml

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
 
 

As part of this course will attempt  from students to realize the meaning of scientific space, to emerged the characteristics that must have the regional policy in order to have the maximum effectiveness, analyzed conceptually the regional development through understanding definitions and concepts and methods that it uses. Finally, we will try the students to understand the multidimensional regional problems  and link it to the multidimensional policy to be followed on solving..

 

Correlation of the course with the Department’s subject

The Department of Economics aims to study and promote economic science. It offers all those theoretical and quantitative tools that allow the understanding of the economic environment. Also this course explores how economic activity is distributed across space and investigates the implications of including spatial aspects in economic analysis.

General Competences
Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Criticism and self-criticism

 

  • SYLLABUS
Week 1: Economic policy, Regional Policy, Regional Development: Concepts and Definitions

Weeks 2-3. Instruments of Regional Policy

Weeks 4-5.  Theories of Regional Development

Weeks 6-9.I EU Regional Policy

Weeks 10-12. Regional Competitiveness

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY Face-to-face presentations from the professors -Exams
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

 

Utilization of eclass.duth.gr
TEACHING METHODS

 

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 52 hours
Study 98 hours
Course total 150 hours
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

 

WRITTEN EXAMS AT THE END OF THE SEMESTER
  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
(1)   Βιβλίο [7648530]: Περιφερειακή ανάπτυξη, Σεραφείμ Πολύζος Λεπτομέρειες

(2)   Βιβλίο [30400]: Σύγχρονη περιφερειακή οικονομική πολιτική, Κόνσολας Νίκος Ι. Λεπτομέρειες

 

 

Operations Research


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE NK83 SEMESTER 8th
COURSE TITLE Operations Research
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
Lectures and exercises 4 6
 
 
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

General Background
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

Mathematics
LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: Greek
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes (in English)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

 

The main goal of the course is the introduction of problem solving using scientific methodologies. Operations research applies scientific methodology to the analysis, of management, function and operation of complex systems, resources, human resources, and/or information. The course is built around non-probabilistic models mainly the linear programming methodology and its variations. Case studies involve among others the transportation problem, the assignment problem, the allocation problem.

 

After the end of the course the student should know the basic concepts of decision making in non-probabilistic environment. They should be able to analyse a real problem, construct the appropriate model (linear, integer, non-linear, dynamic, multi-objective programming) and solve it. The students should be familiarized with the various aspects of sensitivity analysis.

 

 

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

 

·         Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

·         Working independently

·         Working in an interdisciplinary environment

·         Decision Making

·         Project planning and management

 

  • SYLLABUS
 

The course aims to present the basic concepts of operations research in non-probabilistic environment: linear programming, integer programming, dynamic programming, non-linear programming, multi-objective programming. During the course various case studies and examples are presented.

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
·         Class lectures

·         Case studies

·         Notes, slides

USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
·         e-class

 

TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 50
Study 60
Exercises 40
Course total 150
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

 

·         In Class Exam 80%

·         Problem Solving during class 20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
 

·         Hamdy Taha, “Operations Research”, Editions: Collier MacMillan

·         Related Journals:

o   Journal of Operations Management

o   Omega

o   Operations Research

o   European Journal of Operations Research

o   Computers and Operations Research

o   Mathematics of Operations Research

o   Annals of Operations Research

o   American Journal of Operations Research

o   Mathematical Programming

o   Operations Research Letters

 

Mathematical Economics


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE NK84A SEMESTER 8th
COURSE TITLE Mathematical Economics
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
Lectures 4 6
 
 
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

Direction Economic Analysis
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: Greek
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS No
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) http://www.econ.duth.gr/undergraduate/lessons/k1/z4.shtml

 

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

 

Presented dynamic mathematical methods used in economic analysis. (Difference Equations, Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems). Upon successful completion of the course the student / her will be able to:

ü  Understands concepts of dynamic economic theory using mathematical methods.

ü  To use mathematical methods in dynamic economics (modeling using these methods)

ü  To analyze and synthesize data.

ü  To use various ways of thinking (eg inductive, productive).

ü  To develop different problem solving strategies.

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

 

·         Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

·          Analysis and synthesis of data and information

·         Decision-making

·         Working independently

 

  • SYLLABUS
 

I.                     Difference Equations. Economic applications.

II.                   Differential Equations. Economic applications

III.                  Dynamical Systems. Economic applications

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
 Lectures in auditorium

 

USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
·         Use of mathematical package (Mathematica)

·         Support of the learning process via e-class

 

TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 52
Study 98
Course total 150
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

 

·         Written examination (written examination includes questions of various types (multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving)

 

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
 

ü  Σαραφόπουλος, Ν. Μυλωνάς. Γραμμική Άλγεβρα, Βελτιστοποίηση και Δυναμική Ανάλυση για Οικονομολόγους. Εκδόσεις Τζιόλα, Θες/νίκη 2016

ü  Αlrha C.Chiang-Kevin Wainwright, Μαθηματικές μέθοδοι οικονομικής ανάλυσης,  Εκδόσεις Κριτική, Αθήνα,2009

ü  Α. Ξεπαπαδέας, Μαθηματικές μέθοδοι στα οικονομικά, Εκδόσεις Δαρδανός, Αθήνα, 2011

 

 

International Business Relations


(1) GENERAL
SCHOOL
Economic, political and social studies
ACADEMIC UNIT
Department of economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES
undergraduate
COURSE CODE
NE85
SEMESTER
seventh
COURSE TITLE
International business relations
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS
CREDITS
6
6
COURSE TYPE
Special background-specialised general knowledge
PREREQUISITE COURSES:
Introductory macroeconomics, introductory microeconomics
LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS:
Greek
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS
Yes (in English)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)
http://www.econ.duth.gr/undergraduate/lessons/h3.shtml
(2) LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
METHODS
The following methods will be outlined and used in the course:
1. Lectures
2. Essay writing
3 Essay presentation
OBJECTIVES
1. To become familiar with international business risks and benefits
2. To provide an introduction to several conceptual approaches to international business strategy
LEARNING OUTCOMES
1. An ability to integrate empirical evidence into conceptually grounded arguments
TEACHING ARRANGEMENTS
The course will be taught in thirteen four hour lectures in weeks 1-13, followed by thirteen two hour seminars.
General Competences
1.decision making in complex international business problems
2.knowledge of methodological tools in international business strategy
3.search for analysis in business issues
(3) SYLLABUS
Course Description
The globalization of the world economy is radically changing the business landscape. Consequently, multinationals are becoming more ubiquitous as an instrument of economic and business activity. The business leaders of tomorrow need to be trained today in the unique requirements of multinational management. It is toward this objective that the proposed course in international business relations is being offered. Which factors propel firms to expand production abroad? How companies assess political risk to their international operations?
The overall course is divided into three modules, as follows:
Module I–International Business Context– provides an historical perspective on
globalization and presents a viewpoint on its future direction. It also covers some of the globalization drivers including international trade and investment and how they spawn multinational activity. It also examines how states and companies can develop competitive advantage and defines the implications for multinationals as well as host countries.
Module II—International Business Strategies–begins with the theoretical framework of mode and extent of entering foreign markets. It also provides a conceptual framework for formulation of international business strategy.
Module III—Cross Border Alliances, Mergers and Acquisitions–discusses cross border mergers and the associated risks. It also highlights the precautions one needs to take and how to integrate the merged/acquired businesses successfully.
Throughout the course, relevant and real-world case studies as well as other examples would be used to elucidate the theoretical concepts and frameworks. The student grades would be based on: (1) class participation (2) sufficient evidence of understanding of the reading materials assigned (3) presentations of case studies (4) completion of one paper and written exam.
COURSE OUTLINE
1. Introduction
– Class introduction
– Review of course outline and learning objectives
– Present research methods and use of heal-link
– Other matters
2. International Business framework: International Economic Integration—The Past and Present
Reading:
Two Waves of Globalization: Superficial Similarities, Fundamental Differences. (Richard E. Baldwin, Philippe Martin, NBER Working Paper 6904, January 1999, pp. 1-33)
Competitive Advantage of Nations (Michael E. Porter, Harvard Business Review, March-April, 1990, Pp. 73-93)
3. Foreign direct investment theories (a)-analysis and critique
Χαζάκης Κωνσταντίνος, 2000, Εγχειρίδιο ξένων επενδύσεων στις Βαλκανικές χώρες: Οι περιπτώσεις της Βουλγαρίας και της Ρουμανίας, Ζητή, Θεσσαλονίκη.
Χαζάκης Κωνσταντίνος, 2001, Οδηγός ξένων επενδύσεων στην Ανατολική Ασία, Ζητή, Θεσσαλονίκη.
4. Foreign direct investment theories (b)-analysis and critique
Χαζάκης Κωνσταντίνος, 2000, Εγχειρίδιο ξένων επενδύσεων στις Βαλκανικές χώρες: Οι περιπτώσεις της Βουλγαρίας και της Ρουμανίας, Ζητή, Θεσσαλονίκη.
Χαζάκης Κωνσταντίνος, 2001, Οδηγός ξένων επενδύσεων στην Ανατολική Ασία, Ζητή, Θεσσαλονίκη.
5. Sequence and Timing of Internationalization
Reading: The Product Cycle Hypothesis in a New International Environment (Raymond R. Vernon, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, November, 1979, Pp. 255-267)
6. Conceptual Framework of International Business Strategy
Reading: Regional Strategies for Global Leadership (Pankaj Ghemawat, Harvard
Business Review, December 2005)
7.Formulating Global Strategy
Reading: Managing Global Expansion: A Conceptual Framework (Anil K. Gupta and Vijay Govindarajan, Business Horizons, March-April, 2000, Pp. 45-54)
8.Rethinking Global Strategy
Reading: Globalization Frustrated: The Case of White Goods (C.W.F. Baden-Fuller and John M. Stopford, Strategic Management Journal, 12-7, 1991, Pp. 493-507)
9. Market Entry Strategy
Reading: Designing Entry Strategies for International Markets (Franklin R. Root, Entry Strategies for International Markets, New York, Lexington Books, 1990, Pp. 1-23)
10. Cross-Border Mergers and Acquisitions
Reading: The Dubious Logic of Global Megamergers (Pankaj Ghemawat and Fariborz Ghadar, Harvard Business Review, July-August, 2000, Pp. 65-72)
Reading: Making the Deal Real: How GE Capital Integrates Acquisitions (Ronald N. Ashkens, Lawrence J. DeMonaco, and Suzanne C. Francis, Harvard Business Review, Jan-Feb, 1998, Pp. 5-15)
11.Parent/Subsidiary Tensions
Reading: Global Competitive Pressures and Host Country Demands: Managing
Tensions in Multinational Corporations (Yves L. Doz, Christopher A. Bartlett and C.K. Prahalad, California Management Review, Spring 1981, pp. 63-74)
12.Political risk analysis in international business
13. Managing Across Cultures
Reading: What is a Global Manager (Christopher Bartlett and Sumantra Ghosal, Harvard Business Review, August 2003, pp. 1-10)
(4) TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY.
Lectures
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
e-class platform for students
TEACHING METHODS
Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements
The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS
Activity
Semester workload
lectures
52 hours
Seminars-case studies
26 hours
Student assignment
26 hours
Student study
46 hours
Course total
150 hours
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
Description of the evaluation procedure
Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination
Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.
1.Written examination (in Greek)
2.Essays
3.Presentation of essays
They are analysed during the first lecture
(5) ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
• Bartlett C.A. and S. Ghoshal, 2000, «Going Global: Lessons from late movers», Harvard Business Review, March – April, pages 132 – 142.
• Barney J., 1997, «Gaining and Sustaining Competitive Advantage», Addison Wesley Publishing Company.
• Dawar N. and T. Front, 1999, «Competing with giants: Survival strategies for local Companies in Emerging markets», Harvard Business Review, March – April, pages119 – 129.
• Grand R.M., 1998, «Contemporary Strategy Analysis: Concepts, techniques, Applications», Blackwell Business, 3rd Edition.
• Hill C.W.L. and Jones G.R., 2001, «Strategic Management: An Integrated Approach», Boston, Houghton Mifflin Company, 5th Edition.
• Hitt M.A., D.R. Ireland and R.E. Hoskisson, 2001, «Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization», South – Western College Publishing, 4th Edition.
• Kanter Moss, 1994, «Collaborative Advantage: The Art of Alliances», Harvard Business Review, p.p. 96 – 108.
• Melin L., 1992, «Internationalization as a strategy process», Strategic Management Journal, vol 13, Special issue Winter, pages 99 – 119.
• Porter M.E., 1990, «The Competitive Advantage of Nations», The Free Press, U.S.A.
• Rugman A. and R. Hudgetts, 2001, «The End of Global Strategy», European Management Journal, vol. 19, pages 333-343.
• Williamson O., 1975, «Markets and Hierarchies», Free Press, Boston, Mass.
• Κωνσταντίνος Χαζάκης, 2000, Εγχειρίδιο ξένων επενδύσεων στις Βαλκανικές χώρες, εκδ.ζήτη ,θες/νίκη.

Foreign Direct Investments and Multinational Companies


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE NK81 SEMESTER 8th
COURSE TITLE Foreign Direct Investments and Multinational Companies
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
4 6
 
 
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

General Background
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: HELLENIC
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS YES (ESSAY IN ENGLISH)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

 

On successful completion of the module, the student should be able to :

Discuss theories and concepts in FDI and interpret data related to the geographical segmentation of investments and their evolution over time.

Evaluate the context and policies towards FDI in specific countries and regions and recommend appropriate MNE strategies for FDI in these markets.

Assess the major international production theories pertaining to the development, formulation and evolution of FDI and evaluate the motivations and strategies of MNEs for foreign expansion.

Assess the impact of FDI on the development and growth of host countries (on a national, regional and international level) and assess the ethical responsibilities of MNEs towards host communities.

 

 

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

Decision-making

Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Working independently

 

  • SYLLABUS
The course of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and Multinational Enterprises (MNE) deals with the study of multinational enterprise activity in the internationalized market and analyse the presence of Foreign Direct Investments (FDI) and Multinational Enterprises in the economic activity and the formation of the national product. FDI and MNEs are an integral part of an open and effective international economic system and a major catalyst to national, regional and international development. Moreover, due to the increased globalization of most industries and markets, the organization and strategy of modern MNEs is more complicated than traditional organizational models in their pure form. Students will develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the impact of FDI on development, the traditional models of foreign expansion, the quest of MNEs to simultaneously achieve higher levels of global integration and local responsiveness and the new paradigms that corroborate the existence and usefulness of the domestic, global, and transnational models to characterize the most salient features of MNEs.

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
Face-to-face
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
E-mail and e-class
TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 52
Independent study 98
Course total 150
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

Written examination (100%):

– short-answer questions

– open-ended questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
– Suggested bibliography:

Pitelis, C., & Sugden, R. (2000). The nature of the transnational firm. Routledge, Second Edition.

 

Ι. Χασσίδ, Δ. Χιόνης και Κ. Αξαρλόγλου. Το Πρόβλημα των Επενδύσεων και Προτάσεις για την Αντιμετώπισή του. 1η Έκδοση

 

Related academic journals:

 

 

 

 

Entrepreneurship II


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL POLITICAL, SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC SCIENCES
ACADEMIC UNIT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
LEVEL OF STUDIES UNDERGRADUATE
COURSE CODE ΝΚ84B SEMESTER 8
COURSE TITLE ENTREPRENEURSHIP II
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
LECTURES 4 6
WORKSHOPS
LECTURES FROM ENTREPRENEURS
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

SPECIALIZATION
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: GREEK
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS YES
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) http://www.econ.duth.gr/undergraduate/lessons/h7.shtml

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

The course Entrepreneurship II focuses on comprehensive development and application of the specialized knowledge that the students gained during their studies. They find a real business and provide specialized consulting services duting the course of the semester. They perform various tasks of business analysis aiming to get a thorough understanding of the specific business and its environment. Then, they try to find solutions to problems that either specified by the firm’s management or are uncovered by our students in the course of their business analysis.

 

It is an innovative and pioneering course for Greek academic standards as the students apply specialized knowledge on real conditions and real businesses.

 

Entrepreneurship II aims to exploit and enhance the expertise of our students in Economics and Business Administration.

 

At the same time we make an effort to build and improve student confidence with respect to their abilities, knowledge, and technical capabilities. This will enable them to successfully cope in the labor market and in the business world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

 

•                    Teamwork

•                    Decision making

•                    Brainstorming

•                    Innovation

•                    Work in real businesses

•                    Ability to solve complex business problems

•                    Discussion in working groups to solve complex issues

•                    Market Research

•                    Developing relationships with business and management as specialized scientists

•                    Presentation of ideas through IT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • SYLLABUS
 

The foiites / behavior shows provide free consulting services (Business Consulting) in Komotini businesses and the wider region of Eastern Macedonia and Thrace is the living space of the Department of LBB. Created for this purpose Consulting Groups composed of 5-7 senior students / behavior shows. These groups are supervised throughout the semester by the teacher.

The course includes:

• Exploiting the expertise and specialized knowledge of students / three in Economics and Business Administration in real businesses through Consulting Groups (Advisory Groups).

• Diffusion of specialized scientific knowledge of students in the local community.

• Connecting the scientific potential of LBB with businesses in the region.

• Acquisition of know-how and work experience in real conditions for the graduates of the Economics Division.

• Support for undertakings in the region by providing free specialized consulting services based on specific conditions after the crisis and the serious problems they face.

• Long-term and durable connection of the scientific potential of LBB at teacher and student level with the productive fabric of the region.

• Increase productivity and competitiveness of local businesses.

 

The Advisory Groups (Consulting Groups) seek and find companies with which achieve a cooperation agreement to provide free advisory services. The Consulting Groups have an ongoing collaboration during the semester to these enterprises. This cooperation focuses on discussions through organized and scientifically structured interviews and questionnaires with the owners, the management and employees of the company / customer. Is observation, recording and analysis procedures and functions. Used questionnaires in management, marketing, market research, financial analysis and forecasting data for the compilation of the Business Plan, etc.

Examples -among the more-activities in which students / responsible behavior shows:

• The evaluation of investment projects

• The valuation of corporate value

• Provisions demand specific markets

• Preparation of Business Plan

• Conducting market research

• Develop marketing and promotion

• Web design and web marketing

• Research and development programs NSRF

• Specific problems or business requirements in logistics, human resources, production processes, etc.

 

The experience of the past two years has shown that advisory teams have brought solutions to important issues facing local businesses have conducted market research with significant results for the company and have delivered detailed Consulting Reports on various issues optimization of administrative processes, production, distribution and marketing. The cooperating business experience was so good that some of them rewarded with scholarships, prizes and letters of our students.

The course includes:

• Lectures on the specific issues of Business Consulting

• Mentoring of Consulting Groups of students / three on the issues-problems

• Workshops on specific topics and tools Business Consulting and personal development skills of students / three

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
  • Lectures
  • Mentoring
  • Workshops
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
•                     Eclass

•                     Social media

•                     Emails

•                     Teleconferencing

TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 30
Workshops 20
Finding a “customer” 10
On-site cooperation with management 30
Preliminary Consulting Report (PCR) 20
Final Consulting Report (FCR) 40
 
 
Course total 150
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

 

The evaluation of the students in this course is based on:

• the drafting of the Preliminary Consulting Report (PCR)

• the drafting of the Final Consulting Report (FCR)

• the evaluation of Consulting Groups from actual business customers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
Suggested Reading:

• D. Vasiliou N. Irioti, Financial Management Theory and Practice, Rosili Publishers, 2008.

 

 

 

E-commerce


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE NE86 SEMESTER 8th
COURSE TITLE E-commerce
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
4 6
COURSE TYPE ELECTIVE
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: HELLENIC
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS YES (ESSAY IN ENGLISH)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) http://www.econ.duth.gr/undergraduate/lessons/h8.shtml

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
 
E-commerce and e-business describe the way in which transactions are made through networks, especially via the Internet. They are related to the purchase and sale of goods, services and information by electronic means, electronic communications, e-collaboration and e-discovery of information, e-learning, e-government, social networking, etc. The course aims to provide students with the knowledge and tools so they can realize the effect and influence of e-commerce in their professions, businesses and organizations to be employed and finally in their personal lives.

 

Correlation of the course with the Department’s subject

The Department of Economics aims to study and promote economic science. It offers all those theoretical and quantitative tools that allow the understanding of the economic environment. E-commerce is nowadays an integral part of this environment.  This course will develop the skills of students / female students in communication, computer use and processing sites, the analytical and the inductive thinking. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to understand the basics of e-business.

General Competences
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

  • SYLLABUS
Introduction to digital business and e-commerce

Marketplace analysis for e-commerce

Managing digital business infrastructure

E-environment

Digital business strategy

Supply chain management

E-procurement

Digital marketing

Customer relationship management

Change management

Analysis and design

Digital business service implementation and optimisation

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY Face-to-face presentations from the professors and the students
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

 

Utilization of eclass.duth.gr
TEACHING METHODS

 

Activity Semester workload
Professors’ lectures 24 hours
Students’ lectures 12 hours
Essays’ presentations 12 hours
Lecture preparation 12 hours
Essay preparation 90 hours
Course total 150 hours
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

 

 

Assessment tools Percentage Description
Lecture 20% Provided below
Essay 80%

 

Lectures description

Students will form groups of 3 or 4 persons. Then the professors will assign them the presentation of a part of the curriculum. The presentation lasts approximately 40 minutes, it will take place during the scheduled lectures in the semester based on a program set up by the professors. The presentation involves all members of the group and at the end a debate and questions follow. It is possible to use PowerPoint slides.

 

Essays description

The essay is a group one and is related to the issues of e-business that will be presented during the semester. The groups will be the same as those of the lectures. A list of candidate topics will be proposed by the professors. Moreover the students themselves can suggest topics that interest them. Each topic is selected from a single group of students. In the last lectures of the course and on dates to be determined by the professors, groups will present their essays. The duration of each presentation is approximately 40 minutes and involve all group members. At the end of the presentation a debate and questions follow. It is possible to use PowerPoint slides. The essay can be created using word processing (Word, etc.), Slides (PPTs, etc.), web development, etc.
The scoring criteria are as follows:

 

Criteria Weight
Analysis & Justification 0.7
Understanding 0.1
Clearness in Expression 0.1
Presentation 0.1
  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
1 ΨΗΦΙΑΚΕΣ ΕΠΙΧΕΙΡΗΣΕΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΗΛΕΚΤΡΟΝΙΚΟ ΕΜΠΟΡΙΟ: ΣΤΡΑΤΗΓΙΚΗ, ΥΛΟΠΟΙΗΣΗ ΚΑΙ ΕΦΑΡΜΟΓΗ Dave Chaffey ΕΚΔΟΣΕΙΣ ΚΛΕΙΔΑΡΙΘΜΟΣ Ε.Π.Ε 2016
2 ΗΛΕΚΤΡΟΝΙΚΟ ΕΜΠΟΡΙΟ 2010 :ΑΡΧΕΣ-ΕΞΕΛΙΞΕΙΣ-ΣΤΡΑΤΗΓΙΚΗ ΑΠΟ ΤΗ ΣΚΟΠΙΑ ΤΟΥ MANAGER Turban Efraim, King David, McKay Judy, Marshall Peter, Lee Jae, Viehland Dennis, Volonino mL;inda, Cheung Christy, Lai Linda, Polland Carol Α.ΓΚΙΟΥΡΔΑ & ΣΙΑ Ο.Ε. 2011
3 ΗΛΕΚΤΡΟΝΙΚΟ ΕΠΙΧΕΙΡΕΙΝ ΚΑΙ ΜΑΡΚΕΤΙΝΓΚ: ΚΑΙΝΟΤΟΜΑ ΜΟΝΤΕΛΑ ΣΕ ΨΗΦΙΑΚΟ ΠΕΡΙΒΑΛΛΟΝ Μάρω Βλαχοπούλου, Σέργιος Δημητριάδης ΕΚΔΟΤΙΚΟΣ ΟΙΚΟΣ ROSILI 2014

 

Decision Support Systems


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE ΝΕ88 SEMESTER 8th
COURSE TITLE Decision Support Systems
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
4 6
 
 
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

Special Background
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: HELLENIC
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS YES (ESSAY IN ENGLISH)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

The course introduces the student to the field of decision support methods and systems.

 

The learning outcomes are as follows:

– Ability to perceive the characteristics of the decision models in real time or not.

– Ability to locate and select appropriate data to support decision models.

– Ability to analyze, investigate and evaluate a decision model.

– Ability to analyze and draw conclusions on:

o Characteristics and variables in the standardization of decision models

o The characteristics and type of data required to develop and support decision models

o Characteristics and methodological approach to developing decision support systems

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:

– Know basic principles, methodologies and features in decision making models

– Understand the features of decision support systems on the basis of:

o Big Data Management, (Big Data)

o Selecting appropriate data, (Data Mining)

o Development of Management Information Systems, (MIS)

o Decision Support Systems Development (DSS).

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Working independently

 

  • SYLLABUS
The content of the course includes the following sections:

i. Data management for the development of decision models:

a. Data Mining

b. Data Blending

c. Big Data

ii. Introduction to Management Information Systems:

a. Management Information Systems (MIS)

b. Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

c. Data Visualization Systems (DVS)

d. Negotiation Support Systems (NSS)

e. Decision Support Systems (DSS)

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
Face-to-face
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
E-mail and e-class
TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 52
Assignments 20
Independent study 78
Course total 150
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

Written examination (70%):

– Assignments (30%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
– Suggested bibliography:

1.     Ι.Κ.Μουρμούρης, «Εφαρμογές Θεωρίας Αποφάσεων Πολλαπλών Κριτηρίων: Μεταφορές, Χωροθέτηση και Ανάπτυξη», ISBN 9789603516880, Εκδόσεις: Α. Σταμούλης, 2007.

 

2.     Ν. Ματσατσίνης – Κ. Ζοπουνίδης, “Συστήματα αποφάσεων με πολλαπλά κριτήρια”, ISBN 9604610686, Εκδόσεις: Κλειδάριθμος, 2007.

 

– Related academic journals:

International Journal of Management and Decision Making

International Journal of Decision Support Systems

Decision-Making for Supply Chain Integration-Springer

International Journal of Multicriteria Decision Making

Multiple Criteria Decision Making-Springer

Journal of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis

Decision Support Systems

Journal of Decision Systems

Journal of Soft Computing and Decision Support Systems

 

 

 

Banking and Finance


  • GENERAL
SCHOOL Faculty of Social, Political and Economic Sciences
ACADEMIC UNIT Department of Economics
LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
COURSE CODE NE89 SEMESTER 8th
COURSE TITLE Banking and Finance
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
if credits are awarded for separate components of the course, e.g. lectures, laboratory exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded for the whole of the course, give the weekly teaching hours and the total credits
WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS CREDITS
Lectures 4 6
 
 
Add rows if necessary. The organisation of teaching and the teaching methods used are described in detail at (d).
COURSE TYPE

general background,
special background, specialised general knowledge, skills development

Elective (Special Background)
PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION and EXAMINATIONS: Greek
IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) Course description available at e-class https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/KOM06172/

 

 

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes
The course learning outcomes, specific knowledge, skills and competences of an appropriate level, which the students will acquire with the successful completion of the course are described.

Consult Appendix A

·     Description of the level of learning outcomes for each qualifications cycle, according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area

·     Descriptors for Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Appendix B

·     Guidelines for writing Learning Outcomes

 

After the end of the course students should be able to understand, explain and use concepts such as interest rates, bonds and shares. They should know the properties and the relationship between the last two and the first, as well as how bonds and equities are valued. Also familiarize themselves with the Modern Portfolio Theory, the Capital Asset Pricing Model and their connection to interest rates, bonds and equities. Finally, they should be able to explain the role of the banks (and financial institutions in general) in relation to the aforementioned notions and the money supply.

General Competences
Taking into consideration the general competences that the degree-holder must acquire (as these appear in the Diploma Supplement and appear below), at which of the following does the course aim?
Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

Adapting to new situations

Decision-making

Working independently

Team work

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project planning and management

Respect for difference and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Showing social, professional and ethical responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Criticism and self-criticism

Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Others…

…….

 

·         Search for, analysis and synthesis of data and information, with the use of the necessary technology

·         Working independently

·         Production of free, creative and inductive thinking

 

  • SYLLABUS
 

The course aims to present the issues concerning financial institutions and finance globally. It analyzes the assets that investors can use to achieve their investment objectives. These are bonds, shares and financial derivatives, while emphasis is given on their valuation. The definition, behavior and structure of interest rates as well as their effect on the value of the assets under consideration are studied. At the same time their use as a means of financing by stakeholders (companies, organizations, etc.) is analyzed. Portfolio theory and investment management principles are presented, so as to explain how they previous assets are combined in an investment portfolio. Finally, financial institutions, the role of banks and money supply are explored.

 

  • TEACHING and LEARNING METHODS – EVALUATION
DELIVERY
Face-to-face, Distance learning, etc.
·         Class lectures

·         Notes, slides, etc posted on e-class

USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
Use of ICT in teaching, laboratory education, communication with students
·         Support of the learning process via e-class

·         Use of internet

TEACHING METHODS

The manner and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, seminars, laboratory practice, fieldwork, study and analysis of bibliography, tutorials, placements, clinical practice, art workshop, interactive teaching, educational visits, project, essay writing, artistic creativity, etc.

 

The student’s study hours for each learning activity are given as well as the hours of non-directed study according to the principles of the ECTS

Activity Semester workload
Lectures 52
Study 104
Course total 156 (26 hours per Credit Unit)
STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation procedure

 

Language of evaluation, methods of evaluation, summative or conclusive, multiple choice questionnaires, short-answer questions, open-ended questions, problem solving, written work, essay/report, oral examination, public presentation, laboratory work, clinical examination of patient, art interpretation, other

 

Specifically-defined evaluation criteria are given, and if and where they are accessible to students.

 

In class exam

·         Solution of exercises relevant to the quantitative part of the topics covered

·         Comparative assessment of the theoretical topics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • ATTACHED BIBLIOGRAPHY
 

·         Χρήμα και Τράπεζες, Αθανάσιος Γ. Νούλας

·         Χρήμα, πίστη, τράπεζες. Μια ευρωπαική προσέγγιση, Howells Peter, Bain Keith

·          Κυβερνήσεις, χρηματαγορές και μακροοικονομία, Άγγελος Αντζουλάτος